Electric cars fail MoT test on worn tyres more than petrol rivals due to torque and heavy battery

Electric cars fail MoT test on worn tyres more than petrol rivals… and experts say electric power combined with extra weight of battery is to blame

  • Electric vehicles pass MoT tests first time more often than petrol of diesel cars
  • However they are more likely to fail the test because of worn-out tyres
  • Experts believe EVs’ instant torque and extra weight of a battery are the cause

Electric and hybrid cars fail more MoT tests due to worn-out tyres – but they pass first time more often than petrol or diesel vehicles.

Electric and hybrid cars may fail more MoT tests due to worn-out tyres because of their weight

Analysis of 49.9 million MoT tests between 2019 and last year shows 14.84 per cent of hybrid and 17.87 per cent of fully electric cars failed at the first attempt.

The rate for petrol and diesel cars was 20.1 and 23.1 per cent.

It is thought the big difference is because electric vehicle (EV) power plants have fewer moving parts than traditional engines so there is less to go wrong.

But the study by sales website carwow also found that 36.2 per cent of electrics and 33.2 per cent of hybrids that failed first time had tyres below the legal standard, against 28.2 per of diesels and 25.9 per cent of petrol vehicles.

Experts say one reason is the instant torque of electric power and the extra weight of a big battery both contribute to tyre wear.

Hugo Griffiths of carwow said: ‘The instant torque and extra mass is tough on tyres – it should be a huge wake-up call to drivers to check their tyres.’

AA believes that electric cars may fail due to worn out tyres because accelerate more quickly than most petrol or diesel vehicles

AA believes that electric cars may fail due to worn out tyres because accelerate more quickly than most petrol or diesel vehicles

But AA president Edmund King said of the research results: ‘Most EV tyres are specialised and made from more robust compounds with stronger side walls. Tyre wear is mainly affected by driving style and state of the roads.

And Simon Williams of the RAC added: ‘We suspect their higher failure rate for defective tyres may relate more to driving habits than anything else.

‘As EVs can accelerate more quickly than most petrol or diesel vehicles, those who take advantage of this will get through tyres faster than those who drive more conservatively.’

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