Do we really care that the Audi A1 is dead?

With news emerging that puts the future of the A1 in serious doubt, there are ramifications for the broader industry as well as Audi. But the car itself? We won’t miss much


The Audi A1 is a car designed with one purpose: to offer a lower entry price to a desirable brand. Audi has long been famous for its quality materials and right pictureAnd with common mechanical vehicles, it’s as easy to take care of and repair as a Volkswagen or Skoda. A1 was an easy way to let people buy a brand that they might stick with later. But, now, the title of our sister Auto Express suggests, the relatively humble A1 is locked in a guillotine, looking anxiously upwards in a steely inevitability.
The problem is electricity. You’ve probably noticed how all expensive hybrids and BEV’s are, and the ‘more expensive’ types tend to feel like they’re made from vaguely recycled Christmas cracker toys. When you’re dealing with a car — four rings or not — that’s built to a certain price point, the profit margins won’t allow for the batteries. Audi will never sell A1s at a loss, and consumers won’t be happy to pay £25,000 to £30,000 for an Audi electric minivan that has a limited size and cost of about 150 miles. nations. What a puzzle.

Audi - do we really care about the death of the Audi A1?  Blog or memo

Audi waited until the others had their necks off first. Honda has the stylish and desirable city car ‘E’, but it doesn’t sell in large numbers. Fiat has tried to get a stellar picture with the 500 electric car, capable of 199 miles per charge and now starting at less than £20,000, but that’s still a comic small amount of the car for the money. It’s a niche product that’s ideal for very few people and a little suboptimal for everyone else. Audi does not want to fall into this trap. She wants to sell as many cars at a profit as she can. It’s work, after all. very profitable.
The idea of ​​owning an All-Audi is one designed to help traders make a good impression. To befriend a customer who never thought he could buy a new Audi, and who in the future might want to upgrade to an A3, and possibly a Q5. Without building this relationship on A1’s back first, this customer might have gone elsewhere with his money. But, aside from the chance of getting younger and (relatively) less affluent clients through the door, is A1 actually such a big loss? Not right.

Audi A6: beautiful

Audi A6: beautiful

If you drive an Audi, you want it to feel comfortable, comfortable and tight together and make you feel lucky. As if you are doing well in life. Get into any of its large vehicles and each box is marked with a Sharpie. It’s really nice stuff to drive everyday or drive around. The same is true, to a lesser extent, for A5, A4 and A3. But I remember driving a new A1 on the same day as the new A6, and my constant impression from that day was that the smaller car didn’t fit in the same badge. The A1 was noisy, cheap inside and uncomfortable. There were – and still are – a handful of other cheap superminis that are easily better. Few of the hot varieties ever spun have sparkled blue touch paper.
Today all this makes me wonder if losing the A1 might be in the interest of Audi. Higher entry prices for the general domain may make the brand more exclusive again with Q2 as the starting line. Q2, by all accounts, is much nicer than the A1. We’re also told that SUV body styles are more ambitious and desirable for the average buyer. It is entirely possible that eliminating the Audi A1 will increase demand for its remaining products – all of which have higher profit margins and/or can be electrified more easily. Lower sales volumes but higher profits per sale? I don’t think the glossy room in Ingolstadt is full of expensive suits and its inhabitants will hear many complaints.

Audi - do we really care about the death of the Audi A1?  Blog or memo

However, there is an emerging counterargument. By now you must have seen the Renault 5-inspired electric vehicle we reported on last month. Early reports suggest the entry price will be around £18,000. While that’s still a bit compared to the gasoline-powered Clio, you can spend a lot more on the high-spec Ecoboost Fiesta, which typically gets around 40 mpg if you aren’t crushing it hard. If electric power and cheaper running costs (for now) are more important to you than owning more toys than Amazon, Future 5 starts creating a compelling financial case. Can. There is certainly still work to be done on this front.
It increasingly looks like the A1 won’t fit into the all-electric Audi range. But if and when the guillotine is turned on, fans can enjoy the fact that she did her job while she was still relevant. There are a lot of fish in this particular sea.

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